The Ultimate Houseplant Guide: Part 3

Houseplant Tips Series. Part 3 – Don’t Kill with Kindness

This article completes the series for tips on successfully jumping in on the houseplant craze.

By now you’ve picked out your plant, you have a really trendy cachepot, and you know where to set the plant inside your house. Now the only thing left to do is to keep it alive. Easy, right? 🙂

In this article, I’ll give you some tips on how to care for your plant and also how to prevent yourself from caring too much, or as I like to say Killing with Kindness.

Water

The most common cause of death, and the quickest way to certain death, is overwatering your houseplants… The perfect example of Killing with Kindness.

If you are used to gardening and planting flowering container gardens outside your home, you may be tempted to use the same care instructions for your indoor plants. If you happen to do this, you will definitely kill your plants. Indoor plants need much less attention.

Outside your home, the hot, summer sun and wind will dry out your large flower pots daily. Inside your home, the plants are a cozy 72 degrees all year round. Even the bright sun locations inside your home are nothing compared to full sun outdoors. In fact, the shadiest location outside your home gets more indirect light than any room of your house.

All of the above are reasons that your indoor plants will use less water than outdoor plants, but now I’ll just get straight to the point.

Most houseplants like to dry out between watering. Your best bet is to soak the plant deeply and then allow it to dry out over the next 5 to 10 days. Water again when the soil is dry. Not just surface dry, but 2-inches below the soil dry.

Below are a few more watering guidelines to note:

   1. Pot Size – larger pots hold more water. Go easy on ’em!
   2. Vents – If your plant is near a vent it may be thirstier
   3. The brighter the window, the thirstier the plant
   4. Winter – Everything slows down during the cold winter months, plants and people included.
   5. Water with warm water. It soaks in better.

If your soil is very dry, you may need to soak it in the sink. Dry soil sort of repels water and it will escape around the sides of the pot and out the drainage holes!

To Pot or Not to Pot

Most plants do completely fine in their original ‘growing containers’ for at least 12-18 months. At that point, you may need to re-pot to a slightly larger container.

Only increase by up to 3″ diameter for small plants and 6″ diameter for floor plants. Since extra loose soil holds water this will help prevent overwatering.

When you re-pot, it’s OK to remove about 1/3 of the soil and add fresh soil. In fact, your plant will probably like it since, over time, potting soil breaks down and loses some of the tiny air pockets. Roots need air as well as water.

Make sure you have drainage holes! Many indoor pots do not have drainage. If you want to use a pot without drainage, use it as a cachepot. Find out more here.

Fertilizer

Remember, houseplants are not as vigorous and needy as the annuals we plant in our outdoor containers. As a general rule of thumb just fertilize in the spring with a light, indoor plant fertilizer. We like Espoma Organic Indoor fertilizer.

Pest

Every indoor plant owner should have this product. It’s so easy to use. Just sprinkle Bonide Systemic Granules on the top of the soil every 2 months.

Take Care of your plants, but don’t kill them with kindness!

 

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Houseplant Series Pt. 2 – Follow the Light

Houseplant Tips Series. Part 2 – Follow the Light!

Check back in this series for tips on successfully jumping in on the houseplant craze.

If you’re at the garden center looking for a new little green friend to take home, you might see care instructions with words like this: Direct, Indirect, Bright, Moderate, Low… If you’re not used to buying plants for indoors, you may wonder what exactly is the difference? Is it even that important? The answer to the latter question is Yes, and No. “Yes” because the most crucial part for long term success is putting a plant in the correct light conditions. “No” because some times plants will adapt to changes in light conditions (within reason). For starters, lets shed some light on these categories mentioned above. See what I did there?

Light Categories – What Do They Mean?

  1. Direct vs. Indirect – Basically this is the strength of the sunlight your plants are getting. Direct light would be light from the sun directly hitting the plant. Indirect would be light rays that bounce around a few times before they hit your plant
  2. Bright, Moderate, Low 
    1. Bright Light – Plants that like Bright Light are usually needing about 6 hours of sunlight inside your home. The best way to get this is to put them very close to a Southern exposure window because south facing windows get the most sunlight throughout the day. Your second best option would be near a west window. These areas are usually close to a window or a room with great southern exposure. 
    2. Moderate Light – Most plants either require moderate light or will adapt to it. I like to think of moderate light as any room in your home that you can comfortably read a book in without turning on the lights. This could be an area near southern windows or a room with many windows that get good indirect light throughout the day. In my house, I have a room with a large bay window facing the East, and four large windows facing the west. This is my main ‘plant room’ and has decent light throughout the entire day. Kitchens, Foyers, Sitting rooms, and some bedrooms may fit into this category. 
    3. Low Light – Think of this as an East or North facing window, or a room with only one or two windows. Bathrooms and Bedrooms usually fit into this category. 

What Else Should You Know?

  1. What’s outside of the window? – Just because a window faces south does not mean you’ll get Bright Light. What if there’s a large tree or structure blocking your view? Think about the outside of the home.
  2. Plants will adapt – Plants may adapt to new light conditions and move up or down between the categories. During this time, the plant may drop leaves as it’s getting used to lower light levels.
  3. Plants will lose color and become dull if they require more light than they are getting. You may also see the bending and stretching towards the window. In this case, you should probably move it towards the window and continually rotate it so that it keeps its shape. 
  4. Don’t try to adapt a plant to direct light. If you put a plant that needs indirect light into direct light, you’ll see some damage. Most often the leaves will burn and turn brown, or white.
  5. There’s less sunlight in winter. You’ll notice plants slowing down, losing leaves, or changing a bit during the winter months. This is probably because the lower light levels in winter and your plant is going through a dormant period. Just be calm and slow down on your watering as you wait for the spring growing season. 
  6. Light bulbs inside your home don’t count. Plants need full spectrum light produced by the sun or special growing bulbs. 
 
Our Favorite Plants for Each Light Category
 
Indirect Light (unless otherwise mentioned)

 

Get in touch!

Low Light

Air Plants
Benjamin Ficus
Rubber Plant
Orchids
Succulents
String of Pearls (Direct)
Aloe (Direct)
Norfolk Island Pine (Direct)
Cactus (Direct)

 

Moderate Light

Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree
ZZ Plant
Pothos
Spider Plant
Palms
Ponytail Palm
Philodendrons
Monstera
Pothos Vine
Pilea

Bright Light

Birds Nest Fern
Ferns
ZZ Plant
Aglaonema
Deiffenbachia
Snake Plant

Orchid

Rubber Plant

Succulents

ZZ Plant

Fiddle Leaf Fig

Monstera

Snake Plant

Bird’s Nest Fern

Aglaonema

The Ultimate houseplant guide. Part 1 – Use a Cachepot

The Ultimate houseplant guide. Part 1 – Use a Cachepot

Check back in this series for tips on successfully jumping in on the houseplant craze.

If you’re new to houseplants, you may be tempted to take your newly acquired houseplant and buy a pretty, little planter and transplant the plant into the container. Add a little soil, a little fertilizer, and you’re good right? Not exactly. In fact a lot of times that is probably the wrong approach.

Just because that’s the standard practice for outdoor flower planters, do not do that for your indoor plants! Here’s what you should do:

Use a Cachepot.

A cachepot is just a decorative container that holds a potted houseplant. Think of it as a pot inside a pot. Most likely, the cachepot does not have drainage and is ceramic, woven baskets, wood, glass, or basically anything that would look pretty and hold and hide the cheap plastic growing container of a plant. The benefits of using a cachepot are that:

    1. You don’t have to get your hands dirty. Just drop the plant into the pot, and you’re done. If needed prop up your plant with anything you can find around your house – upside down Tupperware or pots, empty water bottles, packing foam, Styrofoam chunks, anything! Most houseplants are best left in their original containers for quite some time. In fact, I would guess that most plants die from poor watering or light conditions than from needing to be re-potted. Up-pot your houseplants only if needed and when doing so just go up in small increments. You don’t want a small root ball sitting in a large pot of loose soil.

       

    2. You’ll have less chance of killing your plant due to over-watering. If you’re using a cachepot as mentioned above, just pull out your small plants once a week and see if they need to be watered. If they need a drink, I just place mine in the bathtub or the sink and soak them really well… then drop them back in the pot. If you leave them in the cachepot while watering, just make sure to prop up your ‘inside pot’ so that it does not sit in water. Also, you may need to dump out your cachepot from time to time as it collects excess water that has drained from the plant.

       

    3. Happy decorating! One of the best reasons, in my opinion, is that you can swap between plants and pots just as easily as you can drag and drop! In the unfortunate case that the plant dies, just throw it away and drop in a new one. Change your cachepot with your mood or with the seasons. Plants in cachepots are one of the hottest new interior decorating elements right now!

       

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3 Indestructible Houseplants for Plant Killers.

3 indestructible Houseplants for houseplant killers

Winter is in full swing, and if you are like the crew here at Wasson’s, you’re probably itching for the smell of fresh grass and flowers. While we’re still a few months away from Spring Fever, you can still bring some of the outdoors inside with some happy houseplants!

If the thought of dead plants in pots are the first thing you thought of, you’re not alone and the Wasson experts can help. We’ve picked 3 of our favorite indestructible houseplants to help start you on your houseplant journey! Read on to find out why we love Snake Plants, Pothos and ZZ Plants so much!  

Have a plant question? Let us know! We're here to help!

Snake Plant

Snake plant or Sansevieria is a member of the Lily Family, popularly goes by other common names like Mother-in-Law’s tongue (we didn’t pick it!). Sansevieria’s durability makes it an awesome option for apartment dwellers that often have limited success with houseplants due to lighting issues.

Snake plant tops our list as because it’s the most tolerant of all decorative plants to survive the most unsuitable growing conditions (that includes plant mom abuse and neglect) a plant could receive. Basically, you have to try really, really hard to kill sansevieria. This classic, yet versatile houseplant is perfect for the forgetful gardener and its considered a top air purify plant for the indoor environment!

Pothos

When you want a plant that grows quick in just about any environment, pothos plants are the plant for you! Every houseplant owner can benefit from planting pothos in their home.

Wasson’s loves these guys because Pothos plants are some of the easiest plants to care for. They thrive in low to medium light and are incredibly durable. Pothos plants are also an incredibly durable plant, hang ’em, plant ’em in a pot… they’re happy either way! This plant is also a plant purification champ, so pick one up today and watch it grow!

ZZ Plant

This list wouldn’t be complete without the ZZ plant. This plant is a looker with its wide, attractive, dark green leaves. ZZ plant handles some pretty intense neglect and is drought tolerant.

ZZ plant accepts low-light conditions, so you can place it almost anywhere and the plant will be just fine. Its waxy, smooth leaves reflect sunlight and brighten rooms. ZZ usually grows slowly to a height and width of two to three feet so it is not a plant monster that outgrows containers quickly.

Succulents

Learn how to care for your succulents, and how to grow more at home! 

Succulents, the little plants that have gripped the heart of people everywhere for their small size and ease of care. While succulents are fairly indestructible… there are a few things you need to do to keep them alive an healthy.

So let’s talk about care…

1. Soil

Use a well-drained potting soil. A main ingredient of any potting mix for succulents will be organic matter. Peat moss, the main ingredient in most, is hard to wet and then dries out quickly.

2. Light

Succulents do best in bright indirect light. Too much light and, they may burn in the afternoon sun. Too much shade will cause them to stretch.

3. Watering

Don’t over water. Allow the plant to dry out between waterings. Provide fertilizer every other time you water to promote growth and plant health.

4. Cirulation

Succulents don’t like being planted in closed containers, like a terrarium with a lid. The extra moisture and humidity could increase chances for rot or disease.

Propagation

Pictured is Succulent propagation

By Leaf

1. Pick off the lower leaves of your succulent
a. Gently wiggle the leaf off the stem, you want a whole leaf
2. Lay your leaves out on a counter or on top of dry soil to callous at the end
3. Once the ends have dried (may take from a few days to a week) add some water to the soil
4. After a few weeks you will start to notice little roots and baby plants sprouting from the leaves
5. Once the baby plant starts growing you can repot the plant in it’s own pot

By Stem

1. Cut the top off the plant
2. Remove a few of the lower leaves from the stem
3. Set the plant top out on a counter or dry soil to callous
4. Once a callous has formed (a few days to a week) add water to the soil and stick the stem into the soil
5. Continue to water as normal
a. Be sure to not over water
6. What do I do with the remaining plant stump?
a. Leave the plant stump alone for a few weeks and you should notice new shoots growing from the       sides of the stump

Are you ready to start growing your own succulents? Come to Wasson Nursery, we have the plants, pots and knowledge to help get you started! See you at the nursery!

Get in touch!

Summer Plant Watering

Summer plant care: 101

It’s Warm out there!

While it may seem natural to water plants frequently throughout the summer, it’s more important to pay attention quality than quantity. If you are watering multiple times a day, there’s a good chance you may be over doing it.

Instead… here are some tips on how to water in the summer months.

1. Think cool.

While we often think about watering in the heat of the afternoon… shake of that immediate impulse to reach for the hose. For maximum impact, water in the early morning or in the evening. This allows for the plants to soak up that H2O. If you water in the middle of the day, you run the risk of the water evaporating before ever reaching your plant!

2. Be thorough.

Make sure to be thorough in your watering. It’s very important to make sure your plants are fully saturated. This will help you increase the time between watering. When watering, slow and steady wins the race. This prevents runoff and allows water to penetrate deeply into the soil.

3. How do I know when to water?

We’re glad you asked. Take a handful of soil, and if you can feel the moisture, then there’s no need to water. If it’s dry… give that plant a drink!

Don’t forget about the free fertilizer

At Wasson Nursery, we’ve got free fertilizer for those who bring their own jugs for a fill up! Stop by and get the same stuff we use on our own plants! See you at the nursery!

 

Want plant help?

If you’re looking for plant recommendations or plant care tips, you’ve come to the right place!

We’re here to help answer your questions!

Whew, It’s hot out there! Here are some drought resistant plants!

Can you believe this heat?

If you have stepped outside in the past week, you know that that sun is HOT. As you also probably know, this kind of heat can do a number on your plants. That balance between over and under watering can be hard to find during the warmer months, so we’re going to take the stress out of summer planting and give you 4 suggestions for drought tolerant, sun loving plants.

1. Portulaca

Portulaca features showy pink cup-shaped flowers with yellow eyes at the ends of the stems from late spring to early fall. Its small succulent oval leaves remain green in color throughout the season.

SunDome Pink Portulaca is an herbaceous annual with a ground-hugging habit of growth. It brings an extremely fine and delicate texture to the garden composition and should be used to full effect.

This is a relatively low maintenance plant, and should not require much pruning, except when necessary, such as to remove dieback. It has no significant negative characteristics.

SunDome Pink Portulaca is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Border Edging
  • General Garden Use
  • Groundcover
  • Container Planting
  • Hanging Baskets

Planting & Growing

SunDome Pink Portulaca will grow to be about 8 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 18 inches. When grown in masses or used as a bedding plant, individual plants should be spaced approximately 14 inches apart. Its foliage tends to remain low and dense right to the ground. This fast-growing annual will normally live for one full growing season, needing replacement the following year.

This plant should only be grown in full sunlight. It prefers dry to average moisture levels with very well-drained soil, and will often die in standing water. It is considered to be drought-tolerant, and thus makes an ideal choice for a low-water garden application.

2. Vinca

Vinca features star-shaped flowers with white overtones and cherry red eyes at the ends of the stems from late spring to mid fall. Its glossy oval leaves remain dark green in color throughout the year. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

It’s a dense herbaceous annual with a ground-hugging habit of growth. Its medium texture blends into the garden, but can always be balanced by a couple of finer or coarser plants for an effective composition.

This plant will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and should not require much pruning, except when necessary, such as to remove dieback. It is a good choice for attracting butterflies to your yard, but is not particularly attractive to deer who tend to leave it alone in favor of tastier treats. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Vinca is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Border Edging
  • General Garden Use
  • Groundcover
  • Container Planting
  • Hanging Baskets

Planting & Growing

Vinca will grow to be about 14 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches. Its foliage tends to remain dense right to the ground, not requiring facer plants in front. Although it’s not a true annual, this fast-growing plant can be expected to behave as an annual in our climate if left outdoors over the winter, usually needing replacement the following year. As such, gardeners should take into consideration that it will perform differently than it would in its native habitat.

3. Zinnia

Zinnias features bold ball-shaped flowers. The flowers are excellent for cutting. Its pointy leaves remain green in color throughout the season. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

The zinnia is an herbaceous annual with an upright spreading habit of growth. Its medium texture blends into the garden, but can always be balanced by a couple of finer or coarser plants for an effective composition.

This is a relatively low maintenance plant. Trim off the flower heads after they fade and die to encourage more blooms late into the season. It is a good choice for attracting butterflies and hummingbirds to your yard. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Zinnias are recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Rock/Alpine Gardens
  • Border Edging
  • General Garden Use
  • Container Planting
  • Hanging Baskets

Planting & Growing

Zinnias will grow to be about 10 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 10 inches. When grown in masses or used as a bedding plant, individual plants should be spaced approximately 8 inches apart. Its foliage tends to remain low and dense right to the ground. This fast-growing annual will normally live for one full growing season, needing replacement the following year.

This plant should only be grown in full sunlight. It does best in average to evenly moist conditions, but will not tolerate standing water. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This particular variety is an interspecific hybrid.

4. Sunpatiens®

SunPatiens® are a dense herbaceous annual with a mounded form. Its medium texture blends into the garden, but can always be balanced by a couple of finer or coarser plants for an effective composition.

This plant will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and should not require much pruning, except when necessary, such as to remove dieback. It has no significant negative characteristics.

SunPatiens® are recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Border Edging
  • General Garden Use
  • Container Planting
  • Hanging Baskets

Planting & Growing

SunPatiens® will grow to be about 24 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches. When grown in masses or used as a bedding plant, individual plants should be spaced approximately 20 inches apart. Its foliage tends to remain dense right to the ground, not requiring facer plants in front. This fast-growing annual will normally live for one full growing season, needing replacement the following year.

This plant performs well in both full sun and full shade. It does best in average to evenly moist conditions, but will not tolerate standing water. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This particular variety is an interspecific hybrid. It can be propagated by cuttings; however, as a cultivated variety, be aware that it may be subject to certain restrictions or prohibitions on propagation.

Catmint Fever

Catmint Fever: Find out why it’s one of our favorite perennials!

This perennial powerhouse is loved for its fragrant purple/blue flowers and its easy going nature. It adapts to most soil types… so just add sun and you can grow catmint in your home!

A Go-To Transition Plant

We love Catmint because its soft color palette allows it to blend in with the other plants in your yard while also providing blooms during that transition period between spring and summer. Catmint is a pollinator favorite

Like its close relative, Salvia, Catmint can be trimmed back after its initial bloom to encourage a second round of color. This also helps the plant look well kept throughout the year.

 

Catmint care

As mentioned earlier, this plant is a sun lover and does best with full to part sun. It grows to be anywhere from 6 inches to 8 feet tall and 12 to 36 inches wide.

Catmint is a deer resistant plant that is drought tolerant, also not to be confused with catnip.

Hope you enjoyed learning more about Catmint! Check back for other great plant and care tips!

Want plant help?

If you’re looking for plant recommendations or plant care tips, you’ve come to the right place!

We’re here to help answer your questions!

The Ultimate Spring Planting Guide: Shady Space Perennials

The Ultimate Spring Planting Guide: Shady Space Perennails

Spring is almost here and we are ECSTATIC for another spring planting season. You may not know it yet, but 2018 is your year for the landscape you’ve always wanted because we’re here to help guide you along the way.

This is the first of a multipart series where our experts give you their insider tips on which plants will thrive in your yard. Today, we’re going to start with your shady spaces.

Areas shadowed by trees, your home or fencing can provide a challenge when it comes to picking a gorgeous plant, but don’t fret! You have options!

Here are our top 4 shade lovin’ plants for your yard!

1. Hostas

Pauls Glory

Hostas are a shade favorite with hundreds of variations and sizing ranging from 12 inches to four feet.

Our pick is the Pauls Glory, otherwise known as the Plantain Lilly. It’s beautiful, low-maintenance and works in your bed or in a container. It’s green-blue fringed leaves and gold-to-white centers make for a beautiful pop of color in your shade space.

 

Here’s what you need to know about the “Pauls Glory”:

Need plant advice? Get in touch with one of our experts!

Sizing

It’s an easy grower that gets to be two feet tall and spreads 3-4 feet.

Color

Boasts a chartreuse and blue-green color that brightens to gold as season progresses

 

Sun

Loves part to full shade and thrives in well-drained soil (but can handle a little sun).

Bloom Times

Blooms in mid summer with lavender flowers.

Watering

We will proactively communicate with positive intent.

2. Coral Bells

Plum Pudding, Caramel

Coral Bells have a broad palette of color, which makes them an easy favorite for all of us at Wasson Nursery. They’re easy to grow and can do well in sun or shade (but too much sun can burn the leaves), and grow well in the Indiana clay soil.

The plum pudding and caramel combo is a stunning choice for any yard. The dark sleek leaves of the plum pudding pairs amazingly with the caramel’s light gold and peachy tones.

 

Here’s what you need to know about the Coral Bell:

 

Sizing

Moderate: grows to be 24 in. tall and 18 to 24 in. wide.

Color

The Plum Pudding black leaves contrast well with the Caramel gold & peach tones.

 

Sun

Thrives in part shade to full sun areas.

Bloom Times

Blooms throughout the summer

Watering

Weekly, or more often in extreme heat or containers.

3. Astible

Can you say spring blooms? These showy flowers have fern-esque foliage help add some color to your shady spots.

Why we love them? While many flowers with gorgeous blooms fail in the shade, these guys thrive. They’re the perfect solution for beds that don’t tend to get a lot of sunlight.

 

Here’s what you need to know about the Astilbe:

 

Sizing

Moderate: grows to be 24 in. tall and 18 to 24 in. wide.

 

Color

Colors vary. Choose your favorite!

 

Sun

Full shade to partial sun

 

Bloom Times

Late Spring to Early Summer

Watering

Water regularly… Once a week or more in extreme heat or container

4. Ferns

Japanese Painted Fern

The Japanese Painted Fern creates a beautiful statement with it silver frond with a touch of blue and deep red stems.

This moderate grower gets to reach about 2 feet tall and 2 feet wide and is a great solution for any shade garden.

Here’s what you need to know about the Japanese Painted Fern:

 

Sizing

This moderate grower gets to reach about 2 feet tall and 2 feet wide.

Color

Dark green-blue fronds that fade to silver and deep red stems. 

Sun

Loves part full to partial shade.

Bloom Times

Dramatic foliage color.

Watering

Water regularly to maintain evenly moist soil.

Pre-order today, get your plants by April 9th!

If your eager to get started, click on any of the links above to reserve your plant! We’ll make sure it gets to your closest Wasson location for pick up on April 9th. At Wasson Nursery we’re here to help you build a better backyard!

Perennial Bloom Times for Sun

Perennial Bloom Times for Sun

One of the greatest design challenges when planning perennial gardens and mixed borders is selecting the right plants to provide continuous color throughout the season. You can create a never-ending cycle of color by using the right sun perennial combinations . The table below guides you in selecting the appropriate perennials so that your sunny spot is splashed with color from April until October. Since bloom times can vary and are affected by temperature and rainfall, the plants are categorized by the calendar month when they usually bloom. Flower color also is listed to assist in planning.

APRIL

 

Botanic Name

Common Name

Flower Color

Aurinia

Basket of Gold

Yellow

Phlox subulata

Moss Phlox

Blue, pink , white

Allium ‘Forescate’

Ornamental Chive

Pink-purple

Pulsatilla

Pasqueflower

Pink, purple red, white

Arabis

Rockcress

White

Lathyrus

Sweet Pea

Pink, white

MAY

 

Geranium sanguineum

Blood-red Geranium

Pink, red-purple, white

Ranunculus

Buttercup

Yellow

lberis

Candytuft

White

Campanula glomerata

Clustered Bellflower

Violet

Heuchera

Coral Bells

Coral, cream, pink, red, white

Geranium endressii

Cranesbill

Magenta, pink

Baptisia

False lndigo

Blue, white, yellow

Paeonia lactiflora

Garden Peony

Coral, pink, red, white

Dictamnus

Gas Plant

Pink, white

Geum

Geum

Orange , red, yellow

Trollius

Globeflower

Yellow

Salvia

Meadow Sage

Blue, purole

Allium ‘Summer Beauty’

Ornamental Onion

Lavender

Leucanthemum

Oxeye Daisy

White

Dianthus

Pinks

Magenta, pink, red, white

Iris sibirica

Siberian Iris

Purple

Cerastium

Snow-In-Summer

White

Iris pallida

Variegated Sweet Flag

Violet

Lysimachia punctata

Whorled Loosestrife

Yellow

JUNE

Centaurea

Bachelor’s Button, Mountain Bluet

Blue

Penstemon

Beard Tongue

Pink, white

Campanula

Bellflower

Blue, pink, white

Belamcanda

Blackberry Lily

Orange, red, yellow

Sisvrinchium

Blue-eyed Grass

Blue

Nepeta

Catmint

Blue, purple

Clematis

Clematis

Blue, pink, purple, red, white

Heuchera

Coral Bells

Coral, pink, red, white

Geranium

Cranesbill

Magenta, pink, purple, white

Euphorbia

Cushion Spurge

Orange, red, chartreuse yellow

Hemerocallis

Daylily

Pink, red, purple, yellow

Delphinium

Delphinium

Blue, pink, white

Baptisia

False lndigio

Blue, purple, white, yellow

Dianthus

Garden Pinks

Pink, red, white

Lysimachia clethroides

Gooseneck Loosestrife

White

Phlomis

Jerusalem Sage

Yellow

Lavandula

Lavender

Blue-purple

Adenophora

Lilyleaf Ladybells

Blue

Scabiosa

Pincushion Flower

Blue, pink

Papaver

Poppy

Coral, pink, red, white

Salvia

Salvia

Blue, purple

Saxifraqa

Saxifrage

Pink, white

Veronica

Speedwell

Blue, pink, white

Coreopsis

Tickseed

Pink, red, yellow

Paeonia suffruticosa

Tree Peony

Coral, pink, purple, red, white, yellow

Callirhoe

Winecups

Magenta

Iris pseudacorus

Yellow Flag

Yellow

JULY

Platycodon

Balloon Flower

Blue, pink, white

Monarda

Bee Balm

Blue, pink,white

Rudbeckia

Black-eyed Susan

Yellow

Gaillardia

Blanket Flower

Red, orange, yellow

Buddleia

Butterfly Bush

Purple,white, yellow

Asclepias

Butterfly Weed

Orange, white

Echinacea

Coneflower

Orange, pink, purple, white, yellow

Veronicastrum

Culver’s Root

Pink, White

Hemerocallis

Daylily

Pink, purple, red, yellow

Heliopsis

False Sunflower

Yellow

Phlox paniculata

Garden Phlox

Pink, purple, white

Cephalaria

Giant Scabious

Light yellow

Alcea

Hollyhock

Coral, pink, purple, red, white

Kalimeris

Japanese Aster

White

Stachys

Lamb’s Ears

Purple

Lilium

Lily

Orange, pink, red, white

Lychinis chalcedonica

Maltese Cross

Orange, red

Physostegia

Obedient Plant

Pink, white

Tanacetum

Painted Daisy, Feverfew

Pink, white

Macleaya

Plume Poppy

Cream

Lychnis coronaria

Rose Campion

Fuchsia

Malva

Rose Mallow

Pink

Perovskia

Russian Sacie

Blue

Eryngium

Sea Holly

Blue, white

Leucanthemum

Shasta Daisy

White

Phlox macu!ata

Spotted Phlox

White

Stokesia

Stoke’s Aster

Blue, white, yellow

Oenothera

Sundrops

Yellow

Verbena

Verbena

Red, purple

Achillea

Yarrow

Pink, red, white, yellow

AUGUST

Aster x. frikartii Monch

Aster

Lavender-blue

Veronicastrum

Culver’s Root

Pink, white

Silphium

Cup Plant

Yellow

Liatris

Gayteather

Purple, white

Clematis tangutica

Golden Clematis

Yellow

Solidago

Goldenrod

Yellow

Lysimachia clethroides

Gooseneck Loosestrife

White

Helenium

Helen’s Flower, Sneezeweed

Yellow

Origanum

Ornamental Oregano

Light pink

Filipendula

Queen of the Prairie

Pink, white

Kirengeshoma

Yellow Waxbells

Yellow

SEPTEMBER

 

Caryopteris

Bluebeard

Blue, pink

Boltonia

Bolton’s Aster

Pink,white

Nepeta subsessilis

Catmint

Blue

Clematis viticella

Clematis

Pink, purple, red, white

Eupatorium

Joe Pye Weed

Pink, white

Ceratostigma

Leadwort

Blue

Aster novae-angliae

New England Aster

Pink, purple

Allium ‘Ozawa

Ornamental Chives

Pink- purple

Hibiscus

Rose Mallow

Pink, red, white

Sedum

Stonecrop

Pink, red, white, yellow

Clematis terniflora

Sweet Autumn Clematis

White

Clematis virginiana

Virgin’s Bower

White

LONG BLOOMING PERENNIALS

Bloom for 6 weeks or more

 

Rudbeckia

Black-eyed Susan

Yellow

Nepeta

Catmint

Blue, purple, white

Echinacea

Coneflower

Orange, pink, purple, white, yellow

Hemerocallis (Stella series)

Daylily

Orange, pink, purple, white, yellow

Heliopsis helianthoides

False Sunflower

Yellow

Sedum

Sedum

Pink, red, white, yellow

Coreopsis

Tickseed

Pink, yellow