The Ultimate Houseplant Guide: Part 3

Houseplant Tips Series. Part 3 – Don’t Kill with Kindness

This article completes the series for tips on successfully jumping in on the houseplant craze.

By now you’ve picked out your plant, you have a really trendy cachepot, and you know where to set the plant inside your house. Now the only thing left to do is to keep it alive. Easy, right? 🙂

In this article, I’ll give you some tips on how to care for your plant and also how to prevent yourself from caring too much, or as I like to say Killing with Kindness.

Water

The most common cause of death, and the quickest way to certain death, is overwatering your houseplants… The perfect example of Killing with Kindness.

If you are used to gardening and planting flowering container gardens outside your home, you may be tempted to use the same care instructions for your indoor plants. If you happen to do this, you will definitely kill your plants. Indoor plants need much less attention.

Outside your home, the hot, summer sun and wind will dry out your large flower pots daily. Inside your home, the plants are a cozy 72 degrees all year round. Even the bright sun locations inside your home are nothing compared to full sun outdoors. In fact, the shadiest location outside your home gets more indirect light than any room of your house.

All of the above are reasons that your indoor plants will use less water than outdoor plants, but now I’ll just get straight to the point.

Most houseplants like to dry out between watering. Your best bet is to soak the plant deeply and then allow it to dry out over the next 5 to 10 days. Water again when the soil is dry. Not just surface dry, but 2-inches below the soil dry.

Below are a few more watering guidelines to note:

   1. Pot Size – larger pots hold more water. Go easy on ’em!
   2. Vents – If your plant is near a vent it may be thirstier
   3. The brighter the window, the thirstier the plant
   4. Winter – Everything slows down during the cold winter months, plants and people included.
   5. Water with warm water. It soaks in better.

If your soil is very dry, you may need to soak it in the sink. Dry soil sort of repels water and it will escape around the sides of the pot and out the drainage holes!

To Pot or Not to Pot

Most plants do completely fine in their original ‘growing containers’ for at least 12-18 months. At that point, you may need to re-pot to a slightly larger container.

Only increase by up to 3″ diameter for small plants and 6″ diameter for floor plants. Since extra loose soil holds water this will help prevent overwatering.

When you re-pot, it’s OK to remove about 1/3 of the soil and add fresh soil. In fact, your plant will probably like it since, over time, potting soil breaks down and loses some of the tiny air pockets. Roots need air as well as water.

Make sure you have drainage holes! Many indoor pots do not have drainage. If you want to use a pot without drainage, use it as a cachepot. Find out more here.

Fertilizer

Remember, houseplants are not as vigorous and needy as the annuals we plant in our outdoor containers. As a general rule of thumb just fertilize in the spring with a light, indoor plant fertilizer. We like Espoma Organic Indoor fertilizer.

Pest

Every indoor plant owner should have this product. It’s so easy to use. Just sprinkle Bonide Systemic Granules on the top of the soil every 2 months.

Take Care of your plants, but don’t kill them with kindness!

 

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Houseplant Series Pt. 2 – Follow the Light

Houseplant Tips Series. Part 2 – Follow the Light!

Check back in this series for tips on successfully jumping in on the houseplant craze.

If you’re at the garden center looking for a new little green friend to take home, you might see care instructions with words like this: Direct, Indirect, Bright, Moderate, Low… If you’re not used to buying plants for indoors, you may wonder what exactly is the difference? Is it even that important? The answer to the latter question is Yes, and No. “Yes” because the most crucial part for long term success is putting a plant in the correct light conditions. “No” because some times plants will adapt to changes in light conditions (within reason). For starters, lets shed some light on these categories mentioned above. See what I did there?

Light Categories – What Do They Mean?

  1. Direct vs. Indirect – Basically this is the strength of the sunlight your plants are getting. Direct light would be light from the sun directly hitting the plant. Indirect would be light rays that bounce around a few times before they hit your plant
  2. Bright, Moderate, Low 
    1. Bright Light – Plants that like Bright Light are usually needing about 6 hours of sunlight inside your home. The best way to get this is to put them very close to a Southern exposure window because south facing windows get the most sunlight throughout the day. Your second best option would be near a west window. These areas are usually close to a window or a room with great southern exposure. 
    2. Moderate Light – Most plants either require moderate light or will adapt to it. I like to think of moderate light as any room in your home that you can comfortably read a book in without turning on the lights. This could be an area near southern windows or a room with many windows that get good indirect light throughout the day. In my house, I have a room with a large bay window facing the East, and four large windows facing the west. This is my main ‘plant room’ and has decent light throughout the entire day. Kitchens, Foyers, Sitting rooms, and some bedrooms may fit into this category. 
    3. Low Light – Think of this as an East or North facing window, or a room with only one or two windows. Bathrooms and Bedrooms usually fit into this category. 

What Else Should You Know?

  1. What’s outside of the window? – Just because a window faces south does not mean you’ll get Bright Light. What if there’s a large tree or structure blocking your view? Think about the outside of the home.
  2. Plants will adapt – Plants may adapt to new light conditions and move up or down between the categories. During this time, the plant may drop leaves as it’s getting used to lower light levels.
  3. Plants will lose color and become dull if they require more light than they are getting. You may also see the bending and stretching towards the window. In this case, you should probably move it towards the window and continually rotate it so that it keeps its shape. 
  4. Don’t try to adapt a plant to direct light. If you put a plant that needs indirect light into direct light, you’ll see some damage. Most often the leaves will burn and turn brown, or white.
  5. There’s less sunlight in winter. You’ll notice plants slowing down, losing leaves, or changing a bit during the winter months. This is probably because the lower light levels in winter and your plant is going through a dormant period. Just be calm and slow down on your watering as you wait for the spring growing season. 
  6. Light bulbs inside your home don’t count. Plants need full spectrum light produced by the sun or special growing bulbs. 
 
Our Favorite Plants for Each Light Category
 
Indirect Light (unless otherwise mentioned)

 

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Low Light

Air Plants
Benjamin Ficus
Rubber Plant
Orchids
Succulents
String of Pearls (Direct)
Aloe (Direct)
Norfolk Island Pine (Direct)
Cactus (Direct)

 

Moderate Light

Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree
ZZ Plant
Pothos
Spider Plant
Palms
Ponytail Palm
Philodendrons
Monstera
Pothos Vine
Pilea

Bright Light

Birds Nest Fern
Ferns
ZZ Plant
Aglaonema
Deiffenbachia
Snake Plant

Orchid

Rubber Plant

Succulents

ZZ Plant

Fiddle Leaf Fig

Monstera

Snake Plant

Bird’s Nest Fern

Aglaonema

Outdoor Living Trends 2019

Outdoor Living Trends 2019

Are you ready for a fresh new landscape in 2019? The Wasson Nursery design team is here to help you out! Read on for great tips on reliable plants, hardscape trends and more? Read on!

Focus on smaller, easier to maintain plants. 

Give the people what they want. As designers, many of our favorite plants these days happen to be plants that are more compact, less messy or grow more slowly. It’s no coincidence that the reason for this is that it’s what our customers demand. Gone are the days of planting a bush and having to trim it twice a year to keep it from becoming some frightful monstrosity. Growers and plant breeders have been tirelessly working on plants with better growth habits, color variations, disease resistance, and increased bloom period. All of these factors contribute to one of our biggest trends in landscaping – landscapes that feature more compact, easier to maintain plants.

Examples

  1. Bobo Hydrangea – stays around 3ft tall and has prolific white blooms all summer long.
  2. Spilled Wine Weigela – Burgundy leaves and bright pink flowers are a focal point of this low growing, sun-loving plant
  3. Mr. Bowling Ball Arborvitae and Green Gem Boxwood are two small, slow-growing evergreens.
    Catmint is one of our favorite families of perennials. Try the newer ‘Kitten Around’ for a more compact relative of the famous ‘Walker’s Low’.
  4. Royal Gem Crabapple is a very small crabapple perfect for a front door area or a specimen around a patio.

 

Staycation – Make your yard feel like a vacation year round

The trend continues… This trend first gained steam after the economic collapse in 2008. People starting pouring money into their backyards instead of splurging on vacations. Today we see this trend in full swing. What sort of amenities would you add to your backyard to make it feel like a vacation (aside from poolside cocktail service)? 

Here are some must haves
A Sonance Sound System. 8 perfectly arranged speakers plus an in-ground subwoofer truly sets the mood for any situation. Not to mention they have a very classy, quality appearance.

Landscape Lighting. Lighting technology getting better and better. Choose fixtures that compliment your space, the styles are endless. One of the coolest new products in this realm is the InLight patio lights. These were a show stopper at our booth at the Suburban Indy Outdoor Living show.
Great Furniture. You want to be comfortable in your staycation, right? Choose well-designed pieces of furniture that mimic the styles and durability of indoor furniture.

Outdoor kitchens. It’s more than just a place to grill. Add refrigerators, smokers, pizza ovens, and don’t forget a bar area.

BackYard Structures are Focal Points

Structures such as pergolas or pavilions have always been included in outdoor living projects. But the trend of recent projects have focused on the structures to truly be a focal point. Angled roof lines, custom shapes and sizes, bold colors and combining materials are some of the ways to make your structure stand out.

Include Private, Secluded Spaces

We use our backyards as an escape from the stresses of the day and as the perfect place to unwind. But sometimes you need to take it a step further and escape from your escape. We love incorporating smaller, more intimate seating areas, especially around a fire pit. Incorporate large plantings to help provide some privacy. 

Pavers –  Larger format and combining size and texture

Neutral color tones and larger slabs of pavers are replacing smaller, more intricate patterns. The neutral color tones and simplicity of larger pavers help to create a more modern feel as well as a more calming environment. If you want to add some interest, do so with a pop of unique texture created by smaller pavers such as Antika by Techobloc.

Neutral Color Palette

Let the plants do the talking. We’re seeing customers move to a more neutral color palette when it comes to their patio decor. Especially with planters. Off-white, beige, black, and dark gray are the colors that are winning the battle for the hearts of new customers. If you want more of a statement, choose an interesting shape or texture on the planter, but keep it neutral and let the plants do the talkin’.

Houseplants

There’s been a resurgence of houseplants inside the home. In fact, it’s one of the hottest interior design trends right now. And as you may or may not know, inside trends become outside trends. That’s why we’re seeing traditional houseplants being used more and more in outdoor pots. It’s new, it’s different, it’s trendy.

High-Quality Furniture

Outdoor furniture is taking cues from inside the home and getting more comfortable, better design, and lasting longer. It is the finishing touch, the icing on the cake to a fantastic outdoor living project.

Ready to get started?

Our professionals know how to build a better backyard! Fill out the form on this page or check out one of our Garden Centers in Fishers, Muncie or Union City, Indiana… Because at Wasson Nursery, Inspiration grows!

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Planning for Spring!

Planning for Spring Starts Now!

Is 2019 the year you finally update your landscape? If you’re new to hiring a landscaping company or you haven’t done in it in many years, here’s a quick guide on what to do first, what to expect, and how to get the perfect end result.

What do you want?

When you call out a company like ours to give you an estimate, it helps to have a good idea of what you want to do. This may sound obvious, but there’s a lot to think about in determining what you want.

First of all, know your Budget. While it may be hard to talk about, it’s really important to know how much you want to spend and what typical projects cost. That way you can streamline the planning and design process and get your project scheduled!

Here is a very basic pricing guide to help determine your budget.
  • Patios – Estimate $20 to $25 per sq. ft. installed. This is an average price and of course could be higher or lower, but for the most part, this should give you an idea. Patios are generally one of the largest parts of a backyard project.
  • Outdoor Kitchens – We’ve done kitchen projects that range anywhere from about $8,000 to $25,000 to even higher. It really depends on how elaborate you want to get. Do you want the basics (a fridge and a grill) or do you want the ultimate experience? An Italian Pizza Oven, a 36″ American Muscle Grill, beautiful granite tops, counter height cooktop and bar height dining area, etc. The options are endless.
  • Structures – The trends are showing that more and more people want a structure over their patio and or kitchen. Consider a pergola if you’re not cooking or entertaining and just want a little shade. Budget around $8,000 to 10,000 range for starters. If you have a kitchen, you’ll most likely want to protect you and your guests from the elements. Go with a custom pavilion and you’ll stay clear of the rain. Factor about 2x the price of a pergola.
  • Custom Fire Pits – Plan for anywhere from $2,500 – $5,000 for the perfect custom firepit.
  • Landscape Enhancement – Not all backyard renovations include patios and hardscaping. You may just want to update your landscaping. You can redefine your beds or swap out plants, add trees. Lots of folks are opting to remove overgrown plant material and install newer varieties that have more controlled growth habits – meaning less maintenance over the long haul. Trends are going towards compact, ever blooming varieties (examples of this are very abundant in the hydrangea family). Also, tree installations are on the rise as many people look to dress up their suburban landscapes.

Budgeting a landscape renovation is very dependent on your unique situation. Almost impossible to give an ‘average budget’ but for the purposes of this article, I would say most ‘neighborhood homes’ should factor in around $5,000 minimum to really begin to update their landscape. This would involve one to two sides of the house and removing many plants and adding many plants.

 

For larger projects, you could see your budget stretch into the $20,000 dollar range.

Get in touch!

Timeline

Besides budgeting, your second most important consideration is the timeline! If you are wanting a project done this year, you may already be a little behind schedule, but it’s OK! Just know it is very important to begin planning as soon as you know your budget. Landscaping is a very ‘in demand’ product and demand is growing every year.

Most companies are already booking major projects well into 2019. Combine the higher demand with seasonality and an industry labor shortage and you’ll find that many companies are going to be stretched to get all their work done. So bottom line – start early!

Here are some timing things to consider:

You’ll start with an initial appointment to assess the project and then we’ll build your design. The time from call in, to the initial appointment and then to completed design could take as little as 1 month for smaller projects and up to 2 months for larger projects. If you wait until May and June for your initial appointment, you’ll likely push this timeline out by another 2 weeks.

Once the plan is approved, you may wait another month for installation to begin.

Installation times will vary greatly with the degree of difficulty and amount of work but just know that once we begin a project, we don’t pull our crews off until the project is complete. Using a company like Wasson means you’ve got a company with all the resources to pull off a seamless installation experience.

 

Other things to remember:

Depending on where you live, we may have to jump through hoops of getting HOA approval and Permitting to build structures. Just know that this may add to the timeline of a project. Here at Wasson, helping you jump through these hoops is all part of our design process.

OK, If you’re still reading this that means I haven’t completely scared you. And you’re in luck! Because the only other thing to consider is to determine what you want! And if you’re not sure of the overall look that you want – relax.

Our design team is one area that sets us apart from landscape competition. In fact, we’ve won countless awards such as “Muncie’s Finest Landscaper and Patio Builder” for too many years to count. Also “Best of Houzz – Design” for the last 3 years. So we’re more than happy to take the lead and design the backyard of your dreams!

To get a head start, take a look at landscape projects in our online portfolio, Instagram and Facebook have great content, and finally check out Houzz for lots of inspiration.

3 Indestructible Houseplants for Plant Killers.

3 indestructible Houseplants for houseplant killers

Winter is in full swing, and if you are like the crew here at Wasson’s, you’re probably itching for the smell of fresh grass and flowers. While we’re still a few months away from Spring Fever, you can still bring some of the outdoors inside with some happy houseplants!

If the thought of dead plants in pots are the first thing you thought of, you’re not alone and the Wasson experts can help. We’ve picked 3 of our favorite indestructible houseplants to help start you on your houseplant journey! Read on to find out why we love Snake Plants, Pothos and ZZ Plants so much!  

Have a plant question? Let us know! We're here to help!

Snake Plant

Snake plant or Sansevieria is a member of the Lily Family, popularly goes by other common names like Mother-in-Law’s tongue (we didn’t pick it!). Sansevieria’s durability makes it an awesome option for apartment dwellers that often have limited success with houseplants due to lighting issues.

Snake plant tops our list as because it’s the most tolerant of all decorative plants to survive the most unsuitable growing conditions (that includes plant mom abuse and neglect) a plant could receive. Basically, you have to try really, really hard to kill sansevieria. This classic, yet versatile houseplant is perfect for the forgetful gardener and its considered a top air purify plant for the indoor environment!

Pothos

When you want a plant that grows quick in just about any environment, pothos plants are the plant for you! Every houseplant owner can benefit from planting pothos in their home.

Wasson’s loves these guys because Pothos plants are some of the easiest plants to care for. They thrive in low to medium light and are incredibly durable. Pothos plants are also an incredibly durable plant, hang ’em, plant ’em in a pot… they’re happy either way! This plant is also a plant purification champ, so pick one up today and watch it grow!

ZZ Plant

This list wouldn’t be complete without the ZZ plant. This plant is a looker with its wide, attractive, dark green leaves. ZZ plant handles some pretty intense neglect and is drought tolerant.

ZZ plant accepts low-light conditions, so you can place it almost anywhere and the plant will be just fine. Its waxy, smooth leaves reflect sunlight and brighten rooms. ZZ usually grows slowly to a height and width of two to three feet so it is not a plant monster that outgrows containers quickly.

Aeration Season is Coming!

Aeration Season is Coming!

Can you believe that fall is just around the corner? Before you start digging out the Halloween decor, you’re going to want to schedule that Aeration service!

By taking a lawn aerator through your yard, the Wasson Nursery Lawn Care team is able to pull out small plugs from your yard via the tines in the aerator. This reduces the compaction of soil and allows oxygen and nutrients to penetrate to the roots of your grass.

Why aerate?

Indiana is home to hard clay soil, and over time this soil gets more and more compacted. By opening a gateway to the roots of your grass, you are breaking up this compaction and allowing your lawn to take in oxygen and necessary nutrients.

Over time, you may start to notice moss plants growing in your yard. While it might seem to make sense to attack the moss plant with herbicide, there’s chance that your soil compaction is preventing proper drainage, allowing these guys to thrive. An aeration application may be just what the doctor ordered!

Ready to aerate?

You’re in luck! Early fall is the best time to aerate! This gives the grass time to heal and fill in any open areas after soil plugs are removed so that your lawn is looking it’s best come spring.

Want to schedule your aeration application today? Fill out the form to get in touch!

 

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Summer Plant Watering

Summer plant care: 101

It’s Warm out there!

While it may seem natural to water plants frequently throughout the summer, it’s more important to pay attention quality than quantity. If you are watering multiple times a day, there’s a good chance you may be over doing it.

Instead… here are some tips on how to water in the summer months.

1. Think cool.

While we often think about watering in the heat of the afternoon… shake of that immediate impulse to reach for the hose. For maximum impact, water in the early morning or in the evening. This allows for the plants to soak up that H2O. If you water in the middle of the day, you run the risk of the water evaporating before ever reaching your plant!

2. Be thorough.

Make sure to be thorough in your watering. It’s very important to make sure your plants are fully saturated. This will help you increase the time between watering. When watering, slow and steady wins the race. This prevents runoff and allows water to penetrate deeply into the soil.

3. How do I know when to water?

We’re glad you asked. Take a handful of soil, and if you can feel the moisture, then there’s no need to water. If it’s dry… give that plant a drink!

Don’t forget about the free fertilizer

At Wasson Nursery, we’ve got free fertilizer for those who bring their own jugs for a fill up! Stop by and get the same stuff we use on our own plants! See you at the nursery!

 

Want plant help?

If you’re looking for plant recommendations or plant care tips, you’ve come to the right place!

We’re here to help answer your questions!

Plants make people happy.

Plants make people happy.

Chances are, if you’re reading this, you probably already know that plants make people happy. What you might not know is that experts agree.

Sure, plants are beautiful, but the correlation between plants and happiness goes deeper than appearance. Studies have shown that having indoor plants or spending time in the garden can have significant psychological benefits.

Cactus

Jonathan S. Kaplan Ph.D., explains in Psychology Today, that potted plants in different environments, such as offices, school and hospitals, have improved well-being, decreased feelings of anxiety, lowered blood pressure and increased job satisfaction.

“Relative to a barren environment, the research suggests that having plants around you is a good thing for your health and productivity,” he explains.

Pretty cool right?

 

So how do plants make people happy?

Plants improve psychological health by boosting your mood. All plants have M. vaccae, a microbe found in soil that functions as a natural antidepressant. It releases cytokines, which boosts your mood by leading your brain to produce more serotonin.

You know that calming feeling you get when you spend time outdoors… That’s science at work!

Adding indoor plants to your home or office and spending time outdoors just makes you feel happier on a cellular level.

 

Beautiful Synergy

Have you ever found yourself looking for that spark of creativity? I know I have. Plants can help by boosting creative brain waves, fostering patience and instilling calm to create an amazing symbiotic relationship.

When it comes to physical health, plants help you breath easier by improving air quality

When you take all of this into account, it’s not surprising that people with plants report a greater sense of joy. Plants just make people happy. They improve our mental and physical health, and who couldn’t use a little boost now and again?

When you’re ready to dig in, come visit us at our locations in Fishers, Muncie and Union City! We’d be happy to help you pick out the perfect plant for your needs!

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Small spaces have big opportunities!

Small spaces have big opportunities!

Outdoor living spaces come in all shapes and sizes, and just because you have a small yard doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice style… it just means that it’s time to get a bit more creative.

1. Outdoor living rooms are IN.

Taking the indoors to outdoor living spaces is a trend that isn’t going away. If you have a small patio, dress it up with a colorful conversational set for seating, matching rug, planters and lights. It will make your exterior a cozy extension of your indoor space.

2. Multi-purpose furniture

If you plan to use the outdoor room for multiple functions, use multi-functional furniture. For instance, trunks can serve as storage for odds and ends items and double as extra seating. A short wall can be utilized as a bench while also adding a level to the room, and so on.

3. Think vertical

If you don’t have space to build out, build up! Anything from stacked planters to hanging an herb garden can give an interesting visual and help optimize the space.

4. Opt out on grass.

If you have a really small yard, think about forgetting those hard to mow spaces by using stone and pavers for a visually striking yard without the lawn care hassle.

5. De-clutter

While it might be tempting to try and squeeze as much as possible into your small space, don’t. Try to aim for a fewer large container plants instead of several small ones. Also, know what you want to use the space for and keep only the essentials. Clever storage can help you keep miscellaneous items hidden but close at hand.

Hope these tips help, and if you’re ready to take your small space to the next level, give us a call! We’d be happy to help you design your dream space!

That’s why we’ve compiled this list of things you can do to optimize the space for a cozy oasis in your own backyard.

Get in touch!

Whew, It’s hot out there! Here are some drought resistant plants!

Can you believe this heat?

If you have stepped outside in the past week, you know that that sun is HOT. As you also probably know, this kind of heat can do a number on your plants. That balance between over and under watering can be hard to find during the warmer months, so we’re going to take the stress out of summer planting and give you 4 suggestions for drought tolerant, sun loving plants.

1. Portulaca

Portulaca features showy pink cup-shaped flowers with yellow eyes at the ends of the stems from late spring to early fall. Its small succulent oval leaves remain green in color throughout the season.

SunDome Pink Portulaca is an herbaceous annual with a ground-hugging habit of growth. It brings an extremely fine and delicate texture to the garden composition and should be used to full effect.

This is a relatively low maintenance plant, and should not require much pruning, except when necessary, such as to remove dieback. It has no significant negative characteristics.

SunDome Pink Portulaca is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Border Edging
  • General Garden Use
  • Groundcover
  • Container Planting
  • Hanging Baskets

Planting & Growing

SunDome Pink Portulaca will grow to be about 8 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 18 inches. When grown in masses or used as a bedding plant, individual plants should be spaced approximately 14 inches apart. Its foliage tends to remain low and dense right to the ground. This fast-growing annual will normally live for one full growing season, needing replacement the following year.

This plant should only be grown in full sunlight. It prefers dry to average moisture levels with very well-drained soil, and will often die in standing water. It is considered to be drought-tolerant, and thus makes an ideal choice for a low-water garden application.

2. Vinca

Vinca features star-shaped flowers with white overtones and cherry red eyes at the ends of the stems from late spring to mid fall. Its glossy oval leaves remain dark green in color throughout the year. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

It’s a dense herbaceous annual with a ground-hugging habit of growth. Its medium texture blends into the garden, but can always be balanced by a couple of finer or coarser plants for an effective composition.

This plant will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and should not require much pruning, except when necessary, such as to remove dieback. It is a good choice for attracting butterflies to your yard, but is not particularly attractive to deer who tend to leave it alone in favor of tastier treats. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Vinca is recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Border Edging
  • General Garden Use
  • Groundcover
  • Container Planting
  • Hanging Baskets

Planting & Growing

Vinca will grow to be about 14 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches. Its foliage tends to remain dense right to the ground, not requiring facer plants in front. Although it’s not a true annual, this fast-growing plant can be expected to behave as an annual in our climate if left outdoors over the winter, usually needing replacement the following year. As such, gardeners should take into consideration that it will perform differently than it would in its native habitat.

3. Zinnia

Zinnias features bold ball-shaped flowers. The flowers are excellent for cutting. Its pointy leaves remain green in color throughout the season. The fruit is not ornamentally significant.

The zinnia is an herbaceous annual with an upright spreading habit of growth. Its medium texture blends into the garden, but can always be balanced by a couple of finer or coarser plants for an effective composition.

This is a relatively low maintenance plant. Trim off the flower heads after they fade and die to encourage more blooms late into the season. It is a good choice for attracting butterflies and hummingbirds to your yard. It has no significant negative characteristics.

Zinnias are recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Rock/Alpine Gardens
  • Border Edging
  • General Garden Use
  • Container Planting
  • Hanging Baskets

Planting & Growing

Zinnias will grow to be about 10 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 10 inches. When grown in masses or used as a bedding plant, individual plants should be spaced approximately 8 inches apart. Its foliage tends to remain low and dense right to the ground. This fast-growing annual will normally live for one full growing season, needing replacement the following year.

This plant should only be grown in full sunlight. It does best in average to evenly moist conditions, but will not tolerate standing water. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This particular variety is an interspecific hybrid.

4. Sunpatiens®

SunPatiens® are a dense herbaceous annual with a mounded form. Its medium texture blends into the garden, but can always be balanced by a couple of finer or coarser plants for an effective composition.

This plant will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and should not require much pruning, except when necessary, such as to remove dieback. It has no significant negative characteristics.

SunPatiens® are recommended for the following landscape applications;

  • Mass Planting
  • Border Edging
  • General Garden Use
  • Container Planting
  • Hanging Baskets

Planting & Growing

SunPatiens® will grow to be about 24 inches tall at maturity, with a spread of 24 inches. When grown in masses or used as a bedding plant, individual plants should be spaced approximately 20 inches apart. Its foliage tends to remain dense right to the ground, not requiring facer plants in front. This fast-growing annual will normally live for one full growing season, needing replacement the following year.

This plant performs well in both full sun and full shade. It does best in average to evenly moist conditions, but will not tolerate standing water. It is not particular as to soil type or pH. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. This particular variety is an interspecific hybrid. It can be propagated by cuttings; however, as a cultivated variety, be aware that it may be subject to certain restrictions or prohibitions on propagation.